Essay rwanda genocide

Oh, yes, VR you may rightly point the finger at the Catholic Church but what hidden poison guided VATcity atrocities? The Jesuits, no less where we pick up the snake-trail through the Portuguese (?) Empire invasion of South America for a clue to the jew - Ignatius Layola 1556 the found of the Jesuits. There followed the global grande inquisition method of MK torture using behaviourism, extorting barbarianism and cannabalistic blood-festing in the name of 'almighty jesus christ'. Why, in 700 AD did this pustule on the arse of humanity convert to Judaism? To give a veneer of respectability of sorts to a tribe which should have been excised long before and have been exiled long since. We are confused by the term 'jew' - a deliberate obfuscation of the fact that a venemous mega-serpent entered our garden of earth. I can liken this to an unnatural mechanised sperm peircing the egg of creation through a form of scientific intervention. Just as they have followed through with their invitro fertilisation programmes.

In response to Leana’s comment regarding her inability to understand how regular Hutu folks could participate in the killings of neighbours: “Machete Season,” by Jean Hatzfeld, is a book that really helped me to see what a horribly effective system of genocide was put into action in 1994. Through interviews with the killers, one can see how the leaders of the Interahamwe (sp?) had planned this over years, making lists of Tutsis in local villages so they knew who to kill when the time was announced. Once the genocide began, Interahamwe leaders were dispatched to these villages and the choice given to these regular-folk Hutus was to kill or be killed. It seems that once a person’s hands were bloodied, and they were complicit in the crimes, they just continued with the massacres in a form of blood-lust. As the men killed, the women looted the homes. Several of the killers reported that they were fed beef everyday (the cattle of the murdered Tutsi) and given lots of beer, and that it was the best they had eaten in years. The age-old resentments of the poor farming Hutu toward the “wealthier” cattle-herding Tutsi continuted to be stirred. It was also telling that although many Rwandans consider themselves to be Catholic, they ceased attending Church during these months out of guilt, or fear, etc. It is not easy to read such stories, but I found it to be very informative with respect to the ugliest side of humanity. This was a genocide that was planned in a very strategic manner. They not only killed Tutsis, but also any moderate Hutus who were viewed as potential obstacles in their plans. The absence of the international community, or any group who would stand up on behalf of the victims and say “NO!” provided further evidence, in their eyes, that Hutu-Power would succeed, and that there would be no accountability for the evil they perpetuated. It is one of the most horrible atrocities in our recent human history.

In this essay, it was demonstrated that the “shadow of Somalia”, national interest and lack of internal pressure, or short “lack of political will”, were the main factors that led to the international community’s failure to prevent and stop the Rwandan genocide. The main actors Belgium, the US and France had sufficient information on what was going on and the quick and effective evacuation of foreign nationals as well as France’s intervention in July show that they also had the capacity to intervene. Furthermore, the Genocide Convention of 1948 not only carries moral but also legal responsibilities. Lack of political will led to the failure of the Security Council, which has responsibility for international peace and security. Its malfunction meant that UNAMIR was never able to protect or save Rwandan lives and became a bystander to genocide. Recognition of international failure to prevent and stop the Rwandan genocide should be the first step in ensuring that it will never again fail another state in the face of genocide.

With most of the people viewing the cases not part of the actual genocide, whose justice was it really? I wondered about my host family, and the kids I had met at refugee camps in Uganda. Does locking perpetrators up behind bars in these faraway cases actually mean anything to them? Does it give them closure or any sort of benefit? Maybe in the long term – with the conflicts in Eastern and Central Africa becoming increasingly interconnected, arresting the ringleaders of one genocide might very well help to prevent the next. Arresting Joseph Kony in Uganda will ultimately benefit people in Congo and Sudan as well. But what about the short term? What about an apology or assistance for the boy I met in an orphanage whose parents were killed in front of his eyes at the age of 4? He has lived his life as an orphan since then. What about the young woman who was raped, infected with HIV, and is now an outcast from society because the rape was perceived as her fault? They are the ones whose lives were destroyed, not the international community. The kids in orphanages and refugee camps will most likely never physically see the men who organized so many crimes against them. Will they be able to come to terms with being orphans simply because the men who organized the massacre killing their parents are in jail? What justice is served for every child who lost a parent, every family who lost years of life and education in a refugee camp, and every generation of lost children? Or can any system ever create adequate individual justice for what was lost? The Gacaca courts were an important step, but people still slip through the cracks. My host sister was scoffed at when she tried to present her case of being raped because a.)it was her word against a man’s, and b.) she was fourteen years old at the time and was accused of making the story up.

Essay rwanda genocide

essay rwanda genocide

With most of the people viewing the cases not part of the actual genocide, whose justice was it really? I wondered about my host family, and the kids I had met at refugee camps in Uganda. Does locking perpetrators up behind bars in these faraway cases actually mean anything to them? Does it give them closure or any sort of benefit? Maybe in the long term – with the conflicts in Eastern and Central Africa becoming increasingly interconnected, arresting the ringleaders of one genocide might very well help to prevent the next. Arresting Joseph Kony in Uganda will ultimately benefit people in Congo and Sudan as well. But what about the short term? What about an apology or assistance for the boy I met in an orphanage whose parents were killed in front of his eyes at the age of 4? He has lived his life as an orphan since then. What about the young woman who was raped, infected with HIV, and is now an outcast from society because the rape was perceived as her fault? They are the ones whose lives were destroyed, not the international community. The kids in orphanages and refugee camps will most likely never physically see the men who organized so many crimes against them. Will they be able to come to terms with being orphans simply because the men who organized the massacre killing their parents are in jail? What justice is served for every child who lost a parent, every family who lost years of life and education in a refugee camp, and every generation of lost children? Or can any system ever create adequate individual justice for what was lost? The Gacaca courts were an important step, but people still slip through the cracks. My host sister was scoffed at when she tried to present her case of being raped because a.)it was her word against a man’s, and b.) she was fourteen years old at the time and was accused of making the story up.

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